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Football Flashback: The Anglo-Scottish Cup

Aberdeen v St Johnstone - the first ever Anglo-Scottish Cup fixture 1975   Blackburn Rovers v Hibernian - Anglo-Scottish Cup 1977

"If you’re looking for an omen, then think of Nottingham Forest!"

So said Blackburn Rovers manager Jim Smith in his programme notes as he tried and failed to whip up some excitement about this 77/78 Anglo-Scottish Cup fixture against Hibernian. Alluding to Forest’s 76/77 ‘double’ triumph of gaining promotion into the top flight and winning the Anglo-Scottish Cup he hoped success in this minor tournament may inspire his team to  ’do a Forest’ and win promotion.

Unfortunately for Jim Smith and Blackburn Rovers it didn’t quite work out like that though they did manage a hattrick of rather dubious Anglo-Scottish Cup firsts.

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Huddersfield Town v Galatasaray 1976
The Turkish giants enjoyed a fair bit of success during the seventies. They were Turkish champions three times, won the Turkish Cup twice and the Turkish League Cup once. They also regularly appeared in European competition.
Galatasaray hit the jackpot with their Turkish Cup win of 1975/76 for according to the programme notes, as well as qualifying to play in the European Cup Winners Cup, they were 'rewarded' with a month long pre-season tour of England.
A certain Malcolm Allison had recently taken charge of the Istanbul club following his resignation from Crystal Palce in May 1976.  He was soon back in England however as his new club met fourth division Huddersfield Town, who incidentally in the 75/76 season were the first English League Champions to play in the basement division. They also visited top flight Stoke City and third division Mansfield Town.
I can’t find any match stats for these three games Galatasaray played so if you know scores, goalscorers, attendances etc then please do leave a comment below.

Huddersfield Town v Galatasaray 1976

The Turkish giants enjoyed a fair bit of success during the seventies. They were Turkish champions three times, won the Turkish Cup twice and the Turkish League Cup once. They also regularly appeared in European competition.

Galatasaray hit the jackpot with their Turkish Cup win of 1975/76 for according to the programme notes, as well as qualifying to play in the European Cup Winners Cup, they were 'rewarded' with a month long pre-season tour of England.

A certain Malcolm Allison had recently taken charge of the Istanbul club following his resignation from Crystal Palce in May 1976.  He was soon back in England however as his new club met fourth division Huddersfield Town, who incidentally in the 75/76 season were the first English League Champions to play in the basement division. They also visited top flight Stoke City and third division Mansfield Town.

I can’t find any match stats for these three games Galatasaray played so if you know scores, goalscorers, attendances etc then please do leave a comment below.

Match of the Century
England v Hungary 1953

Match of the Century

England v Hungary 1953

Blades v Gunners FA Cup 1978 - My first visit to BDTBL
I’d been pestering my dad to take to me to the Lane for ages and finally he relented. The game we picked was the home FA Cup tie against Arsenal in January of 1978. The Blades were in the old second division whilst Arsenal were of course in the top flight. The game was the last of what had been a very hectic christmas and new year programme of football.
Utd had beaten Leyton Orient 2-0 at home on Boxing Day. The day after they visited Luton Town and got tonked 4-0. They were back in action on New Years Eve away at Hull City and won 3-2. Two days later on the 2nd January Spurs came to Bramall Lane and played out a 2-2 draw. The cup tie against Arsenal was played the day after on the 3rd.
Arsenal had the same packed festive programme. On Boxing Day they beat Chelsea 3-0 at home and the following day won 3-1 at West Brom. New Years Eve saw them travel to Everton where they lost 2-0 but they got back to winning ways on the 2nd January with a 1-0 home win over Ipswich Town. So that was five games in nine days. This was normal back then. Can you imagine today’s pampered  professionals putting up with such a gruelling schedule of games? Not likely!
Anyhow back to the cup tie. I was very excited as you’d imagine. My memories of the day are a bit hazy but a few things stand out really clearly. We stood on the Kop and after going through one of the turnstiles on John Street made our way up the steps towards the back of the Kop. I kept getting a tantalising glimpse of a football pitch to my left as we made our way up the steps. At the top I could see it in all it’s glory and soon found a spot against the wire fence to watch the game.
Only trouble was I was looking down on the old practice pitches which were behind the Kop on Shoreham Street which in my boyish enthusiasm I’d mistaken for the real mccoy. My dad and his mate soon put me right and off we went to take our place on the Kop.
I wasn’t at all prepared for the sights and sounds that greeted me as we went through the gangway entrance onto the top of the Kop. The thing I remember most clearly is the pitch, I’d never seen owt like it. The greenest lushest most beautiful grass in the World. It looked like a carpet and was green like no other green I’d ever seen before. Then there was all the people. I thought there’d been a lot stood on the steps and gangways to the rear of the Kop but my god here were thousands upon thousands of folk all crammed together. I’d never seen so many people in one place, all making the loudest din I’d ever heard too. I could barely hear myself speak.
We made our way down the gangway to the front. As a young lad there was no way I would’ve been able to see the game from somewhere in the middle of that heaving swaying mass of bodies. A spot was found for me at the very front of the Kop against the small white fence that ran a round the pitch. I crammed up against it, with my silk scarf tied around my wrist and I looked around in wonder and awe at the sight that greeted my eyes. At this magnificent football ground packed to the rafters with 32000 people. I looked across at the away end and can still see it now. Someone had made a big cardboard replica of the FA Cup. It was either painted silver or covered in tin foil for as it was held aloft, dancing above the heads of the Arsenal dans it glittered and gleamed in the cold January sunshine.
As for the game itself I can’t remember bugger all. It was a blur. I think I spent most of the time gawping at the crowd and really didn’t have a clue what was going off on the pitch. Except that the Arsenal fans kept cheering very loudly. Five times they cheered as their team trounced the Blades 5-0. I didn’t care though this was amazing being here in this place. I was hooked, a blade for life had been made.
Arsenal went on to reach the Cup final of 1978 where they lost 1-0 to Ipswich Town. Roger Osborne lashing in the winner from inside the penalty area. He prompty fainted, overcome with emotion and had to be brought round with smelling salts before being substituted.
As for the Blades they had a strange old season. This 5-0 home loss to Arsenal was the first of a three game run in which they conceded five goals each time. There was a 5-1 home defeat by Bolton and a 5-0 thrashing away at Sunderland. Yet the Blades home record was as good as anyone in the division but away from home it was a different story. Conceding 51 goals away from Bramall Lane this was amongst the worst in the entire football league that season. Only four clubs in all four divisions conceded more.The Blades only won three away from home all season yet this included a 6-1 win at Cardiff. I only hope it’s a similar scoreline this Sunday for our opening championship fixture of this season.
Images of Sheffield United
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Blades v Gunners FA Cup 1978 - My first visit to BDTBL

I’d been pestering my dad to take to me to the Lane for ages and finally he relented. The game we picked was the home FA Cup tie against Arsenal in January of 1978. The Blades were in the old second division whilst Arsenal were of course in the top flight. The game was the last of what had been a very hectic christmas and new year programme of football.

Utd had beaten Leyton Orient 2-0 at home on Boxing Day. The day after they visited Luton Town and got tonked 4-0. They were back in action on New Years Eve away at Hull City and won 3-2. Two days later on the 2nd January Spurs came to Bramall Lane and played out a 2-2 draw. The cup tie against Arsenal was played the day after on the 3rd.

Arsenal had the same packed festive programme. On Boxing Day they beat Chelsea 3-0 at home and the following day won 3-1 at West Brom. New Years Eve saw them travel to Everton where they lost 2-0 but they got back to winning ways on the 2nd January with a 1-0 home win over Ipswich Town. So that was five games in nine days. This was normal back then. Can you imagine today’s pampered professionals putting up with such a gruelling schedule of games? Not likely!

Anyhow back to the cup tie. I was very excited as you’d imagine. My memories of the day are a bit hazy but a few things stand out really clearly. We stood on the Kop and after going through one of the turnstiles on John Street made our way up the steps towards the back of the Kop. I kept getting a tantalising glimpse of a football pitch to my left as we made our way up the steps. At the top I could see it in all it’s glory and soon found a spot against the wire fence to watch the game.

Only trouble was I was looking down on the old practice pitches which were behind the Kop on Shoreham Street which in my boyish enthusiasm I’d mistaken for the real mccoy. My dad and his mate soon put me right and off we went to take our place on the Kop.

I wasn’t at all prepared for the sights and sounds that greeted me as we went through the gangway entrance onto the top of the Kop. The thing I remember most clearly is the pitch, I’d never seen owt like it. The greenest lushest most beautiful grass in the World. It looked like a carpet and was green like no other green I’d ever seen before. Then there was all the people. I thought there’d been a lot stood on the steps and gangways to the rear of the Kop but my god here were thousands upon thousands of folk all crammed together. I’d never seen so many people in one place, all making the loudest din I’d ever heard too. I could barely hear myself speak.

We made our way down the gangway to the front. As a young lad there was no way I would’ve been able to see the game from somewhere in the middle of that heaving swaying mass of bodies. A spot was found for me at the very front of the Kop against the small white fence that ran a round the pitch. I crammed up against it, with my silk scarf tied around my wrist and I looked around in wonder and awe at the sight that greeted my eyes. At this magnificent football ground packed to the rafters with 32000 people. I looked across at the away end and can still see it now. Someone had made a big cardboard replica of the FA Cup. It was either painted silver or covered in tin foil for as it was held aloft, dancing above the heads of the Arsenal dans it glittered and gleamed in the cold January sunshine.

As for the game itself I can’t remember bugger all. It was a blur. I think I spent most of the time gawping at the crowd and really didn’t have a clue what was going off on the pitch. Except that the Arsenal fans kept cheering very loudly. Five times they cheered as their team trounced the Blades 5-0. I didn’t care though this was amazing being here in this place. I was hooked, a blade for life had been made.

Arsenal went on to reach the Cup final of 1978 where they lost 1-0 to Ipswich Town. Roger Osborne lashing in the winner from inside the penalty area. He prompty fainted, overcome with emotion and had to be brought round with smelling salts before being substituted.

As for the Blades they had a strange old season. This 5-0 home loss to Arsenal was the first of a three game run in which they conceded five goals each time. There was a 5-1 home defeat by Bolton and a 5-0 thrashing away at Sunderland. Yet the Blades home record was as good as anyone in the division but away from home it was a different story. Conceding 51 goals away from Bramall Lane this was amongst the worst in the entire football league that season. Only four clubs in all four divisions conceded more.The Blades only won three away from home all season yet this included a 6-1 win at Cardiff. I only hope it’s a similar scoreline this Sunday for our opening championship fixture of this season.

Stenhousemuir v Hibernian 1984
Played on 07/11/84. Stenhousemuir centenary  game for the Willie Ormond Memorial Cup.  Ormond had started his  football career with Stenhousemuir before moving to Hibernian. This game  was also the anniversary of the first floodlit match in Scotland.  Played between the Warriors and Hibs at Ochilview Park on 07/11/51.

Stenhousemuir v Hibernian 1984

Played on 07/11/84. Stenhousemuir centenary game for the Willie Ormond Memorial Cup. Ormond had started his football career with Stenhousemuir before moving to Hibernian. This game was also the anniversary of the first floodlit match in Scotland. Played between the Warriors and Hibs at Ochilview Park on 07/11/51.

Match of the Century 1953 England 3-6 Hungary

Billy Wright’s 100th game for England
The first football player in the World to play 100 times for his country. He made his England debut in September 1946 against the Irish in Belfast. His last and 105th game was in May 1959 at Wrigley Field, Los Angeles against the USA.

Billy Wright’s 100th game for England

The first football player in the World to play 100 times for his country. He made his England debut in September 1946 against the Irish in Belfast. His last and 105th game was in May 1959 at Wrigley Field, Los Angeles against the USA.

Scunthorpe United - Opening of Glanford Park.
Official Souvenir Programme.

First new purpose built football stadium in England since the fifties.


The Football League Representative XI was ..
Peter Shilton (Derby County)
Kevin Pressman (Sheffield Wednesday)
Mel Sterland (Sheffield Wednesday)
Trevor Peake (Coventry City)
Tony Mowbray (Middlesbrough)
Neil Pointon (Everton)
Mike Phelan (Norwich City)
Peter Reid (Everton)
Mark Ward (West Ham United)
Gordon Cowans (Aston Villa)
Danny Wilson (Luton Town)
Trevor Francis (QPR)
Mick Harford (Luton Town)
Robert Fleck (Norwich City)
Keith Houchen (Coventry City)
John Robertson (Newcastle United)

Kevin Keegan turned out as a guest for Scunthorpe but could do nothing to stop the FL XI running out 5-1 winners.
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Proposed new Derby County football stadium 1945
Lost English football grounds

Scunthorpe United - Opening of Glanford Park.

Official Souvenir Programme.

First new purpose built football stadium in England since the fifties.

The Football League Representative XI was ..

  • Peter Shilton (Derby County)
  • Kevin Pressman (Sheffield Wednesday)
  • Mel Sterland (Sheffield Wednesday)
  • Trevor Peake (Coventry City)
  • Tony Mowbray (Middlesbrough)
  • Neil Pointon (Everton)
  • Mike Phelan (Norwich City)
  • Peter Reid (Everton)
  • Mark Ward (West Ham United)
  • Gordon Cowans (Aston Villa)
  • Danny Wilson (Luton Town)
  • Trevor Francis (QPR)
  • Mick Harford (Luton Town)
  • Robert Fleck (Norwich City)
  • Keith Houchen (Coventry City)
  • John Robertson (Newcastle United)

Kevin Keegan turned out as a guest for Scunthorpe but could do nothing to stop the FL XI running out 5-1 winners.

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Here we have a fine looking Newport County programme from the fifties. What I find particularly interesting though are the opponents French club Red Star Olympique. A club with an amazing history. Founded in 1897 as Red Star Club Français by none other than Jules Rimet they are based in the northern Parisian suburb of Saint-Ouen. Today they are know as Red Star FC 93 though throughout their history they’ve had numerous name changes ..
1897-1906 Red Star Club Français
1906-1927 Red Star Amical Club
1927-1946 Red Star Olympique
1946-1948 Red Star Olympique Audonien
1948-1950 Stade Français-Red Star
1950-1967 Red Star Olympique Audonien
1967-1978 Red Star Football Club
1978-1984 AS Red Star
1984-2003 AS Red Star 93
2003-present Red Star FC 93
Once of the French top flight and winners of the French Cup five times including three consecutive wins in the twenties the club have declined in recent years. At one point dropping into the French regional leagues though they’ve recovered a little and now ply their trade in the Championnat de France amateur which is the 4th division in French football.

They are one of the few French clubs to have an English language website and almost certainly the only amateur club to have one. It’s well worth a visit.
AllezRedStar.com
Another reason to like the club is their really cool kit. Must get one.

Here we have a fine looking Newport County programme from the fifties. What I find particularly interesting though are the opponents French club Red Star Olympique. A club with an amazing history. Founded in 1897 as Red Star Club Français by none other than Jules Rimet they are based in the northern Parisian suburb of Saint-Ouen. Today they are know as Red Star FC 93 though throughout their history they’ve had numerous name changes ..

  • 1897-1906 Red Star Club Français
  • 1906-1927 Red Star Amical Club
  • 1927-1946 Red Star Olympique
  • 1946-1948 Red Star Olympique Audonien
  • 1948-1950 Stade Français-Red Star
  • 1950-1967 Red Star Olympique Audonien
  • 1967-1978 Red Star Football Club
  • 1978-1984 AS Red Star
  • 1984-2003 AS Red Star 93
  • 2003-present Red Star FC 93

Once of the French top flight and winners of the French Cup five times including three consecutive wins in the twenties the club have declined in recent years. At one point dropping into the French regional leagues though they’ve recovered a little and now ply their trade in the Championnat de France amateur which is the 4th division in French football.

They are one of the few French clubs to have an English language website and almost certainly the only amateur club to have one. It’s well worth a visit.

Another reason to like the club is their really cool kit. Must get one.

Red Star FC 93

Jimmy Hagan - Football Legend.



Here he is shaking hands with King George VI prior to the wartime international of 19/02/44 at Wembley against the Scots. The players in the shot from right to left are Leslie Smith (Brentford), Stanley Matthews (Stoke City), Jimmy Hagan (Sheffield Utd), Joe Mercer (Everton), Tommy Lawton (Everton), Cliff Britton (Everton).
The game ended 6-2 to England. Hagan contributed 2 goals and the other England goalscorers were Horatio Carter, Tommy Lawton, Joe Mercer and an own goal. Another Sheffield Utd player, Jock Dodds, bagged a brace for Scotland. Following this game Jimmy Hagan had made 13 wartime appearances for England scoring 12 goals. At the end of the war he’d managed a total of 13 goals from 16 games. Quite a record but in one of football’s post-war travesties he was to only win a solitary cap in official internationals. This coming in 1948 against Denmark in Copenhagen.

When he retired from playing football in the late fifties an all-star International XI turned out to honour his contribution to the game and play alongside him against a Sheffield XI made up of players from the local South Yorkshire sides. What a line-up eh ..
Harry Gregg (Manchester Utd & Ireland)
Jimmy Armfield (Blackpool & later England)
Alf McMichael (Newcastle Utd & Ireland)
Danny Blanchflower (Tottenham Hotspur & Ireland) 
Billy Wright (Wolves & England)
Dave Bowen (Arsenal & Wales)
Stanley Matthews (Blackpool & England)
Brian Clough (Middlesbrough & later England)
Jimmy McIlroy (Burnley & Ireland)
Tom Finney (Preston NE & England)

Jimmy Hagan - Football Legend.


Here he is shaking hands with King George VI prior to the wartime international of 19/02/44 at Wembley against the Scots. The players in the shot from right to left are Leslie Smith (Brentford), Stanley Matthews (Stoke City), Jimmy Hagan (Sheffield Utd), Joe Mercer (Everton), Tommy Lawton (Everton), Cliff Britton (Everton).

The game ended 6-2 to England. Hagan contributed 2 goals and the other England goalscorers were Horatio Carter, Tommy Lawton, Joe Mercer and an own goal. Another Sheffield Utd player, Jock Dodds, bagged a brace for Scotland. Following this game Jimmy Hagan had made 13 wartime appearances for England scoring 12 goals. At the end of the war he’d managed a total of 13 goals from 16 games. Quite a record but in one of football’s post-war travesties he was to only win a solitary cap in official internationals. This coming in 1948 against Denmark in Copenhagen.

When he retired from playing football in the late fifties an all-star International XI turned out to honour his contribution to the game and play alongside him against a Sheffield XI made up of players from the local South Yorkshire sides. What a line-up eh ..

  • Harry Gregg (Manchester Utd & Ireland)
  • Jimmy Armfield (Blackpool & later England)
  • Alf McMichael (Newcastle Utd & Ireland)
  • Danny Blanchflower (Tottenham Hotspur & Ireland)
  • Billy Wright (Wolves & England)
  • Dave Bowen (Arsenal & Wales)
  • Stanley Matthews (Blackpool & England)
  • Brian Clough (Middlesbrough & later England)
  • Jimmy McIlroy (Burnley & Ireland)
  • Tom Finney (Preston NE & England)

Jimmy Hagan Testimonial - Sheffield XI v International XI 1958

Picture quiz. Barcelona programme from 1960. Who were the opponents and what was the event?

Picture quiz. Barcelona programme from 1960. Who were the opponents and what was the event?

British Home Championship

A selection of programme covers from games played between England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Mainly British Home Championship games but some aren’t. Can you spot them?

London v Frankfurt 1955. First floodlit match at Wembley. The London XI, who on this ocassion were made up of players from Spurs, Chelsea, Millwall, Charlton, Fulham and Orient, had been the first British club side to appear in European club competition when they’d played a game against a Basle XI in Switzerland in June 1955.
They were not however the first British club side to play at home in Europe. That honour goes to Hibernian who a couple of weeks earlier on October 12th 1955 had played host to Germany’s Rot-Weis Essen in the second leg of their first round European Cup tie.
London won this game against Frankfurt 3-2 after being 2-0 down at half-time. They reached the final of this the first Inter-Cities Fairs Cup tournament but lost 8-2 on aggregate to Barcelona after drawing the first leg 2-2 at Stamford Bridge.

London v Frankfurt 1955. First floodlit match at Wembley. The London XI, who on this ocassion were made up of players from Spurs, Chelsea, Millwall, Charlton, Fulham and Orient, had been the first British club side to appear in European club competition when they’d played a game against a Basle XI in Switzerland in June 1955.

They were not however the first British club side to play at home in Europe. That honour goes to Hibernian who a couple of weeks earlier on October 12th 1955 had played host to Germany’s Rot-Weis Essen in the second leg of their first round European Cup tie.

London won this game against Frankfurt 3-2 after being 2-0 down at half-time. They reached the final of this the first Inter-Cities Fairs Cup tournament but lost 8-2 on aggregate to Barcelona after drawing the first leg 2-2 at Stamford Bridge.

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The Palookaville Stadium. For nine years up to 2008 Brighton & Hove Albion had possibly the coolest, funkiest and most hip sponsorship deal in the history of football. Their shirts were adorned with the logo of Skint Records home of Norman Cook aka Fatboy Slim. Back in October 2004 BHA’s ground the Withdean was renamed to promote Fatboy Slim’s new album Palookaville. So I and 6417 other hardy souls who had turned out to watch the Brighton v Sheffield United Championship fixture had the honour and distinction of being the only people to ever watch a football match at The Palookaville Stadium. Ground hoppers eat your hearts out eh!  The programme notes say,

"there’s no precise definition of Palookaville, but the consensus is that it’s somewhere you don’t want to be - which makes it an ideal temporary name for Withdean"

No arguments there. The Seagulls turned out in a limited edition strip for the day. The match ended in a 1-1 draw.

The Palookaville Stadium. For nine years up to 2008 Brighton & Hove Albion had possibly the coolest, funkiest and most hip sponsorship deal in the history of football. Their shirts were adorned with the logo of Skint Records home of Norman Cook aka Fatboy Slim. Back in October 2004 BHA’s ground the Withdean was renamed to promote Fatboy Slim’s new album Palookaville. So I and 6417 other hardy souls who had turned out to watch the Brighton v Sheffield United Championship fixture had the honour and distinction of being the only people to ever watch a football match at The Palookaville Stadium. Ground hoppers eat your hearts out eh!  The programme notes say,

"there’s no precise definition of Palookaville, but the consensus is that it’s somewhere you don’t want to be - which makes it an ideal temporary name for Withdean"

No arguments there. The Seagulls turned out in a limited edition strip for the day. The match ended in a 1-1 draw.

Palookaville - Brighton & Hove Albion Palookaville - Brighton & Hove Albion